Tag Archives: rodents

Is Your Personal Vehicle a Traveling Pest Hotel ?

Vehicles, cars, camper-vans, buses and trucks, provide many pests with a warm dry environment that often contains food. Vehicles can also provide these pests with transport, spreading the pests to wherever the vehicle travels.

Pests such as ants, spiders, fleas, roaches and rodents (rats and mice) can infest vehicles in the same way they infest homes.

Cavities in vehicles can provide warm dry places for ants to build nests and they will often find food dropped in the vehicle.

spider-web-on-carSpiders find the gaps around wing mirrors and door jams the perfect places to hide and build webs around mirrors and other parts on the vehicle.Rat yelling

Rodents will nest in cars left parked for long periods and may do significant damage to vehicle wiring and upholstery (not to mention the stink when they die in the vehicle).

Another pesky creature that can invade vehicles is the dreaded Bed Bug.

Bed bugs inbed-bug-engorgedvade cars and other forms of transportation.  They are hitchhikers extraordinaire! These many legged creatures sneak into vehicles via clothing, purses, boxes and cartons, luggage and even books and stuffed animals. They love clutter and choose living near a convenient host,You!

Other insects and even small animals can infest vehicles and are usually attracted because of something stored in the vehicle.

Here are a few tips for keep invading pests out of your vehicles.

  • Keep it Clean! –washing-carBe sure to keep your vehicle clean and remove clutter on a regular basis. This is the best way to deter pests from making themselves at home. Clean the outside too. Don’t forget to wash the undercarriage, wheel wells and under the hood. Your wheels are a critters bridge from the road into the vehicle.
  • Use a power vacuum – Make sure to keep your carpets and mats super clean! If you don’t have a good strong vacuum, use the pay-per-use vacuums at a gas station or car wash.
  • Shampoo –Shampoo or steam clean carpets and other fabrics.
  • Natural repellents – Making a solution of vinegar and lemon or vanilla is a great way to keep bugs and spiders away.  Just wipe surfaces with a 50/50 solution. There are other herbs that also turn away unwanted visitors, such as eucalyptus. Always test the surface to be treated first to make sure the solution doesn’t do any harm.
  • Insecticide – Always follow the label instructions and employ recommended safety measures. Once the vehicle is all clean, spray a little under each floor mat; just spraying-cockroachenough to keep insects away but not to overpower you with its smell or fumes. If you keep your car outside, spray around the perimeter of your vehicle.

If you know or suspect you have an infestation on your hands, be aware that a DIY approach will not always provide a successful solution. Professional pest exterminators should be consulted to provide accurate identification, and proper and successful control methods.

Rats and Mice, Fall’s Most Unwanted.

Fall (and continuing through winter) is the time of year that nearly all of the rat infestations occur, according to a survey from the NPMA (National Pest Managemroof-ratent Association).

 

With daytime and overnight temperatures falling, animals go into overwintering mode and for them this means leaving the landscape for warmer places which can provide food and water and a safer environment in which to have and raise their young. Your home is at the top of their list!

Rats (and mice) are our most frequent unwanted visitors, this time of year.mouse-brown

Besides being disgusting, noisy and destructive, rats and mice can contaminate food, spread diseases, bring on allergies and even invite their friends; fleas, ticks and lice into your home.  Rats, especially, have been known to damage property by chewing through drywall, insulation, and electrical wiring (including vehicle wiring).  So, if you park your car outside, don’t forget to check under the hood frequently.

Prevent rats and mice from making your house their home by:

  • Removing yard debris and trash. Always look for places you think rats might like to live such as wood- piles and thick ground covers. Take time to thin out the vegetation and move firewood away from the home. Frequently restacking the wood will also discourage rodents from the area.
  • Keeping trash cans tightly closed. rat-in-trash-bag-2
  • Storing pet food or bird seed in metal cans with secure lids.
  • Picking up fallen fruit. (Don’t feed the rats!)
  • Bringing in pet bowls and bird feeders at night when rodents are the most active.
  • Keeping your home in good repair. Check for openings where rodents can get in. Remember that a mouse can squeeze through a hole as small as a dime, and rats can enter through quarter-sized holes. Covering the openings with metal, concrete or mesh wool or copper mesh wool will stop them from getting in.

Rats and mice are sneaky, determined  creatures, so if they’ve gotten past your best defenses, it’s time to call in the professionals.   

rat-at-dentist-1_k2puy3y6fb6ohq-5csefwhttps://youtu.be/km2Vnk4cE70

Fun Fact:

Rats and mice have a need to gnaw. 

Rats and mice gnaw to take care of their teeth.  Their front teeth constantly grow and without gnawing and chewing to reduce the size of their choppers, the teeth would grow right out of their mouths until they would be unable to eat therefore starving to death or the bottom incisors would poke through the roof of the mouth stabbing into the brain. Not a good way to go!

Dirty Rats and Marauding Mice, Harbingers of Sickness and Death!

Every time I sit with my grandkids and watch their favorite movie, Disney’s, Ratatouille, I can only picture in my mind the “cute”, humanized rats running around a kitchen, peeing and pooping uncontrollably even shedding hair and their fleas and mites as they create fantastic meals for their human patrons.  I am so grossed out!  Rat-infested-kitchenYou see, being in the pest control industry for over 20 years has taught me a lot about animal habits and physiology, and although it is a myth that they have no bladders and no sphincter muscles, it’s a fact that rats and mice  constantly eleminate their waste wherever they happen to be and quite frequently.  So, wherever they roam, they leave a trail of feces and urine behind.  “ICKY”!Rat yelling

These pests are more than just a nuisance.  Rodents, such as rats, mice and even rabbits, are associated with a number of health risks.  Rats and mice alone are known to spread more than 35 diseases and these diseases can be spread directly to humans, by the handling of live and dead rodents, through rodent bites and through contact with rodent feces, urine and saliva.  Indirectly, diseases can be transmitted through fleas, ticks and mites that have fed on the infected rodents.  Rats and mice carry parasites, like tapeworms and are also responsible for eliciting allergic reactions, as their hair, dander and particles of feces become airborne.

Scary fact; a single mouse is capable of depositing up to 25,000 fecal pellets in a year.  That’s approximately 70 pellets each day (not to mention free flowing urine).rat-poop-in-house  So, there is no question that prevention and prompt removal of these dirty guys, is of paramount importance.

 

 

Guard your home. Guard your health.

Take precautions before cleaning up rodent infested areas.  Get rid of the rodents first, then seal up any entryways to ensure that rodents can’t get in in the future.  Then it’s time to clean. Here is a link to the CDC, Center for Disease Control and Prevention so you have the latest info on how to safely and efficiently clean up after rodents.  If cleaning up after rodents is just too much for you or too ICKY! Check out Corky’s Pest Control’s, Rodent Service program.  

Vector control (a county program) has several suggestions for minimizing rodent infestations like trimming back trees and shrubs, cleaning up pet food and fallen fruits outside, closing entrances to your home larger than a quarter inch and cleaning up rodent feces and urine with a disinfectant that is rated for killing viruses.   They warn to not use a vacuum.  It could push pathogens into the air and increase the chance of someone breathing them in.  cleaning-3309061_960_720It is suggested that if you must use a vacuum, thoroughly spray entire infected area with a disinfectant that kills viruses, then let it stand until it’s dry.  Then vacuum carefully with a hepa-filter equipped vacuum. Don’t forget your face mask!

The following diseases are transmitted via rats:

  • Plague …more
  • Salmonellosis …more
  • Murine Typhus …more
  • Rat-Bite Fever (RBF) …more
  • Leptospirosis …more
  • Eosinophilic Meningitis …more

The following are transmitted by Mice:

  • Salmonellosis …more
  • Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) …more
  • Lymphocytic Choriomenginitis (LCMV) …more

Want to identify the “dirty rats” or “marauding mice” that are invading your space, check out these links:

 www.corkyspest.com/rat-id.html  or www.corkyspest.com/mouse-id.html

It’s Rodent “Beware-ness” week: “Batten Down the Hatches”!

Fall is a time of change.  The weather is cooling, leaves are falling, plants and animals are going into overwintering mode and for animals this means heading out of the landscape for safer, warmer places, like inside your home, inside your car or inside your BBQ (not to mention inside pool equipment cabinets).

 

The most frequent unwanted visitors, this time of year, are Mice and Rats.mice-on-cornRat yelling

 

Besides being disgusting, noisy and destructive, rats and mice can contaminate food, spread diseases, bring on allergies and even invite their friends; fleas, ticks and lice into your home.  Rats, especially, have been known to greatly damage property by chewing through drywall, insulation, and electrical wiring (including vehicle wiring).  If you park your car outside, don’t forget to check under the hood frequently.

Prevent rats and mice from making your house their home by:

  • Removing yard debris and trash. Always look for places you think rats might like to live such as wood piles and thick ground covers. Take time to thin out the vegetation and move firewood away from the home. Frequently restacking the wood will also discourage rodents from the area.
  • Keeping trash cans tightly closed. rat-in-trach
  • Storing pet food or bird seed in metal cans with secure lids.
  • Picking up fallen fruit. (Don’t feed the rats!)
  • Bringing in pet bowls and bird feeders at night when rodents are the most active.
  • Keeping your home in good repair. Check for openings where rodents can get in. Remember that a mouse can squeeze through a hole as rat_pipesmall as a dime, and rats can enter through quarter-sized holes. Covering the openings with metal, concrete or mesh wool or copper mesh wool will stop them from getting in.

Rats and mice are sneaky, determined  creatures, so if they’ve gotten past your best defensive line, it’s time to call in the professionals.  

Fun Fact:

Rats and mice have a need to gnaw. rat-at-dentist-1_k2puy3y6fb6ohq-5csefw

They’re not looking to add wiring or building materials to their diet, they are doing what they need to do to promote good dental health.  Yes, rats gnaw to take care of their teeth.  Their front teeth constantly grow and without gnawing and chewing to reduce the size of their choppers, the teeth would grow right out of their mouths until they would be unable to eat therefore starving to death or the bottom incisors would poke through the roof of the mouth stabbing into the brain. Not a good way to go.

Natural Diasters: Hurricanes, Fires, Earthquakes and Rats!

roof-rat-on-lightMembers of the Muridae family are the dominant species in every region of the world, due to their ability to adapt to and exploit new situations. Commensal rats and mice, those that live at the expense of humans, invade their dwellings, eat their food, upset their comfort, and frequently transmit diseases to them, belong to this family. Three species of commensal rodents are the most widely distributed: the Norway Rat, Rattus norvegicus; the Roof rat, Rattus rattus; and the Common (House)  mouse, Mus musculus.

When natural disasters strike, rats and mice experience the same suffering as humans. Many of them are crushed to death or drowned, die of starvation, or fall prey to infections. Their populations are frequently decimated. Survivors, fearful and disorganized, wander into new areas in search of protection, shelter, and food. It taRat yellingkes time for them to regroup and reorganize their social behavior, become familiar with their new environment, find safe havens, locate food and water, and memorize their movements. All this occurs before they can again begin reproducing.

Colony building and reproduction will only begin when their new ecosystem has stabilized. This typically takes 6 to 10 months under favorable conditions. As the rodent population grows and resettles, people have a greater chance of being exposed to the diseases carried by rodents. Rodent urine and dander also contain allergens that can cause allergic reactions or trigger asthma symptoms in sensitive persons and more than 9,000 persons are treated in emergency departments annually for rat or mouse bites

rat-biting-girl-clipartFACT: Some rats, if provoked and cornered, will fight their way out of a confrontation, as will many wild animals. But most rats and mice do not directly attack humans. Young babies, bed-confined elders, and the homeless sleeping in doorways and alleys, however, are occasionally bitten by unprovoked rats.  In some cases, those cleaning up debris after natural disasters will come in contact with frightened rats (mice) and may experience bites. 

So even with immediately decreasing populations, rats are perceived to be increasing because they gravitate to the same areas as humans and become more prevalent and  evident in those environs.

Why are rodent populations, and their movements, so important after disastediaster-damagers? Because events like Hurricane Irma and Jose, the fires in our great northwest, tornados in the midwest and the earthquakes in the U.S. and Mexico, can change the ecology of affected areas, making it more favorable to rats and other vermin. At the same time, they can curtail community services that can keep these  pests in check.

For more information on Rats and Mice and the illnesses they cause and the diseases they carry, check out this link:  https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/index.html

Need to know how to get rid of Rats and Mice? Check out this website: https://www.corkyspest.com/rats.html